The techlash has come to Stanford. – Slate

The techlash has come to Stanford. – Slate

Marissa Mayer
Photo illustration by Slate. Photos by Bohao Zhao/Wikipedia and Wittayayut/iStock/Getty Images Plus.An Interview With the Alabama Teenager Who Just Won the PowerPoint World ChampionshipWikipedia Is Helping Keep Welsh Alive OnlineHow to Stop Amazon, Apple, or Google Workers From Listening to Your Smart Speaker RecordingsWhite Nationalists Have Flocked to TelegramPalantir is about a 15-minute walk from Stanford University.
That stone’s-throw convenience helped one morning in June when a group of Stanford students perched on the third story of a parking garage across the street from the data-analytics company’s entrance and unfurled a banner to greet employees as they walked into work: “OUR SOFTWARE IS SO POWERFUL IT SEPARATES FAMILIES.”The students were protesting Palantir software that U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement uses to log information on asylum-seekers, helping the agency make arrests of undocumented family members who come to pick them up. The activists are members of a campus group called SLAP—Students for the Liberation of All People—that was founded by Stanford freshmen the winter after Donald Trump was elected president. At first, the group focused on concerns shared by leftist activists around the country: On the day of Trump’s inauguration, for example, members blocked the doors of a Wells Fargo near ....


These days, though, SLAP has turned its attention to the industry in its backyard: Big Tech.
Contrary to what Palantir had publicly stated, an investigation led by Mijente detailed how Palantir lied about their tech not being used to deport & detain migrants & migrant children.This Tuesday’s banner stayed up for an hour—that may be a record. Read: https://t.co/nEZYf617DE pic.twitter.com/DWiX5adRDU— S.L.A.P. (@slapliberate) June 6, 2019 When it’s not getting in Palantir’s face, SLAP wants to convince other Stanford students that they shouldn’t go to work at big technology companies that they see as unethical—places that rely on Stanford’s famed computer science program as a recruiting ground. “Working inside these tech companies is not going to build the future we want to see, ” two SLAP organizers who are seniors at the university told me. .

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